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Walking down Bruntscar Whernside

Organising a Yorkshire Three Peaks event

An organised Yorkshire Three Peaks walk can provide many rich experiences for the people taking part, as well as making positive contributions to the economy of the area.

However, the area is a really popular location for fundraising and challenge events and the number of organised walks puts pressure on the area, sometimes resulting in negative impacts on residents, rescue services, the environment, local amenities and other users.

Please help keep the Yorkshire Three Peaks special for all to enjoy by ensuring your walk is well planned, respects the environment and supports the local community. Here’s how:

Sign up for our notification scheme

If you are organising an event for a group walking the Yorkshire Three Peaks you can tell us about your event here – it’s absolutely FREE.

Why sign up for our free notification scheme?

By notifying us of your group’s walk you are helping us monitor numbers and plan for the future. Importantly, you show others you are committed to minimising your group’s impact on the area, maximising the experience for all involved and playing your part in helping to look after the Yorkshire Three Peaks.

Groups who sign up will receive the following:

  • Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk Guidelines – providing guidance on organising a safe and responsible walk.
  • A listing on our Yorkshire Three Peaks Events list, so others know what’s on when planning their event.
  • Discount on our exclusive Three Peaks merchandise, and OS Explorer map for the area.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Code of Conduct

The Yorkshire Three Peaks is a very special place. The simple messages in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Code of Conduct show what every individual can do to help keep the Three Peaks special for all to enjoy. Pass them on to everyone in your group.

Donate to path maintenance

The Yorkshire Three Peaks are very fragile environments and the path network is under pressure from the thousands of visitors that come to enjoy it each year. It costs on average £35 per metre to maintain the paths.

Help us to maintain the paths on the Yorkshire Three Peaks by donating a minimum of £1 per walker to our Three Peaks Project via our Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority online shop.

Organising your Yorkshire Three Peaks event – FAQS

Do I need permission to organise a Yorkshire Three Peaks event?

The Yorkshire Three Peaks walk is on public rights of way and open access land, so can be accessed and walked by anyone whenever they wish.

While you don’t need permission to walk – you do need permission from the relevant landowner if you require additional facilities like checkpoints, parking areas, and portable toilets.

Remember that the Yorkshire Dales National Park is a working landscape and the majority of the land is privately owned. The Countryside Code provides guidance on how you can respect, protect and enjoy the countryside.

Do I need to register my Yorkshire Three Peaks event?

The Three Peaks walk is on public rights of way and open access land, so can be accessed and walked by anyone whenever they wish – you don’t need to register with anyone to do it.

However, if you are organising an event for a group walking the Three Peaks you can tell us about your event here – it’s absolutely FREE. Letting us know about your walk will help us to monitor numbers and plan and maintain the Three Peaks for the future.

If you notify us of your group’s walk your group will receive:

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk Guidelines – providing guidance on organising a safe and responsible walk.

A listing on our Yorkshire Three Peaks Events list, so others know what’s on when planning their event.

Discount on our exclusive Three Peaks merchandise, and OS Explorer map for the area.

What is the role of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority?

The role of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority is to promote good practice so that events are organised in a way that has minimal impact on the National Park and provides benefits for the local community.

We do not decide if walks can or cannot go ahead. Neither is it our role to help you organise your walk for you. We do not advise on risk assessments or help you do your planning.

How do I go about organising a Yorkshire Three Peaks event?

There are lots of different ways to organise your walk. The experienced group can just get out there with a map and compass, the less experienced can take part in an organised event or hire a company to run their event.

When is the best time to have an event?

Avoid busy periods such as bank holidays and remember that weekends, particularly Saturdays, will be the busiest time.

Check for clashes with other events – particularly if your group size is over 100 people. Refer to the Yorkshire Three Peaks Event Calendar, but be aware that there is no guarantee that this will be comprehensive as notification is not compulsory.

Why not consider undertaking the walk over a couple of days – you’ll get more time to get to know the area and enjoy the stunning landscape of the Yorkshire Dales?

How many people should I have at my Yorkshire Three Peaks event?

There are no rules regarding how many people you can have at an event.

However, the number of people in your group has an impact on the communities and the Three Peaks and it is important that your event is not too large for the environment of the National Park or the local community to cope with.

What is the best way for a group to get to the Three Peaks?

How people travel to the Three Peaks is likely to be one of the biggest impacts that your event has. Large numbers of cars cause congestion, noise, and disruption.

Consider how you can minimise the number of vehicles your participants bring by encouraging car-sharing or arranging transport for them.

Arrange sufficient car parking for the number of participants before the event.

Advise participants not to park inconsiderately. Vehicles should not be parked in passing places, clearways, private roads, tracks, roadside verges, gateways, or pavements. Vehicles must not be parked in a dangerous position or where it causes an obstruction to the road and pavement.