This website makes extensive use of JavaScript. For a richer experience please enable JavaScript in your browser.

High contrast version - your agreement to receive cookies is required

To view a high contrast version of our website we will need to give your computer two cookies. These are functional cookies - they do not collect any of your personal data, but simply remember that you agree to receiving the colour scheme cookies and that you want this website to have a high contrast colour scheme.

If you would like to turn on the high contrast function and receive the cookies, click on the 'accept' button. You will be able to delete the cookies at any time from your machine. If you do not want these cookies or no longer want the site to appear in high contrast colours, click the 'cancel' button. If you do not accept the cookie this function will not work.

We are asking your permission to place these cookies on your machine as part of the European e-Privacy Directive which applies to all sites in the UK. You can find out more about the Directive, the cookies we use on our website and how you can control cookies at www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/privacypolicy.htm#cookies.

Resizing the text size - your agreement to receive cookies is required

To change the size of the text on our website we will need to give your computer two cookies. These are functional cookies. One remembers that you have agreed to receiving the text size cookie while the other one remembers what size of text you have chosen to view the site with. Neither of the cookies collect any of your personal data.

If you would like to change the text size and receive the cookies, click on the 'accept' button. You will be able to delete the cookies at any time from your machine. If you do not want the cookies or no longer want the site to appear with different sized text, click the 'cancel' button. If you do not accept the cookies this function will not work.

We are asking your permission to place these cookies on your machine as part of the European e-Privacy Directive which applies to all sites in the UK. You can find out more about the Directive, the cookies we use on our website and how you can control cookies at www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/privacypolicy.htm#cookies.

Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure you have the best experience on our website and we do not collect your personal information. If you continue without changing your computer settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive our cookies and we will not show you this notice again. You can change your cookie settings at any time so that your computer rejects our cookies.

Find out more about cookies and changing your settings

Malham

One of the most spectacular and well visited villages in the Dales is Malham. With dramatic limestone scenery just a stone's throw from the village centre, Malham has few equals anywhere in the UK.

A bridge over Malham Beck in Malham village The picturesque village of Malham

Just a short walk from the village, with its busy National Park Centre, cafés, Youth Hostel and outdoor and souvenir shops, is Malham Cove. The Cove is a massive natural limestone crescent-shaped cliff and former waterfall. This natural amphitheater extends across the line of the Mid-Craven Fault and is capped by a remarkable area of limestone pavement that has featured in many movies, including Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part I. It is also home to many rare alkaline-loving planets that live amongst the fissures, or grikes, that divide the clints, or blocks of stone.

Easily accessible by footpath to the east is Gordale Scar, an impressive limestone gorge formed by torrents of glacial meltwater eroding frozen limestone and scouring out the gorge. For centuries it was rightly regarded as one of the natural wonders of England.

Close by is Janet’s Foss, another remarkable natural feature with a small cave and waterfall over a curtain of tufa or natural limestone deposits. It is said to be home to Janet, Queen of the Fairies.

The Old Smithy in Malham still exhibits works of art made on the forge The Old Smithy, Malham

It’s a pleasant, if steep, walk along the Pennine Way from Malham village past Malham Cove and through a remarkable natural limestone ‘Dry Valley’ to Malham Tarn, a glacial lake which is now a National Nature Reserve. The Tarn is the highest lake in England, and one of only eight upland alkaline lakes in Europe.

Superb walks abound around Malham. These include Pikedaw Hill, notable for former lead and zinc mines but also offering fine views down Malhamdale and across to the Tarn, and Weets Hill with its monastic cross. There are good tracks to be followed over Kirby Hill to Settle, or the new Pennine Bridleway Settle Loop can be followed via Gorbeck Lane - a green lane - to Langcliffe and Settle. Another fine walk is to follow the footpath over Malham Moor and the Monks’s Road to Arncliffe in Littondale, or to take the Pennine Way over Fountains Fell and Pen-y-ghent to Horton-in-Ribblesdale. The village itself also has great charm.

Local services: pubs, shops, cafes, accommodation, toilets, Youth Hostel, National Park Centre

Like this page? Share it: