This website makes extensive use of JavaScript. For a richer experience please enable JavaScript in your browser.

High contrast version - your agreement to receive cookies is required

To view a high contrast version of our website we will need to give your computer two cookies. These are functional cookies - they do not collect any of your personal data, but simply remember that you agree to receiving the colour scheme cookies and that you want this website to have a high contrast colour scheme.

If you would like to turn on the high contrast function and receive the cookies, click on the 'accept' button. You will be able to delete the cookies at any time from your machine. If you do not want these cookies or no longer want the site to appear in high contrast colours, click the 'cancel' button. If you do not accept the cookie this function will not work.

We are asking your permission to place these cookies on your machine as part of the European e-Privacy Directive which applies to all sites in the UK. You can find out more about the Directive, the cookies we use on our website and how you can control cookies at www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/privacypolicy.htm#cookies.

Resizing the text size - your agreement to receive cookies is required

To change the size of the text on our website we will need to give your computer two cookies. These are functional cookies. One remembers that you have agreed to receiving the text size cookie while the other one remembers what size of text you have chosen to view the site with. Neither of the cookies collect any of your personal data.

If you would like to change the text size and receive the cookies, click on the 'accept' button. You will be able to delete the cookies at any time from your machine. If you do not want the cookies or no longer want the site to appear with different sized text, click the 'cancel' button. If you do not accept the cookies this function will not work.

We are asking your permission to place these cookies on your machine as part of the European e-Privacy Directive which applies to all sites in the UK. You can find out more about the Directive, the cookies we use on our website and how you can control cookies at www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/privacypolicy.htm#cookies.

Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure you have the best experience on our website and we do not collect your personal information. If you continue without changing your computer settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive our cookies and we will not show you this notice again. You can change your cookie settings at any time so that your computer rejects our cookies.

Find out more about cookies and changing your settings

Trees and woodlands

The Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority positively supports landowners and communities to manage and increase the amount of woodlands within the National Park.  This is supported by the Dales Woodlands Strategy and the National Park Management Plan, which has objectives to significantly increase the amount of woodland and to bring all ancient semi natural woodlands into management.  

Creating new woodlands

Over the last 6 years, the 'Dales Woodland Restoration Programme' has funded the creation of 450 hectares of new native woodland in the National Park, almost all of which is on privately-owned land.  The Programme is jointly-funded by the Forestry Commission, the Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust and the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority.

The Authority and its partners have an ambitious target to increase the amount of native woodland by 100 hectares each year for the rest of the decade.

The Authority is also an active participant within a pilot project being run by the Forestry Commission to look at the opportunities for businesses to become carbon neutral and support new woodlands by buying carbon credits. Not only will this help businesses to become green it will assist landowners to create new woodlands.

Managing woodlands

In addition, the management of existing woodlands will mean that they will start to regenerate and develop a wide age structure leading to more carbon capture than an unmanaged wood. The soil structure will develop and carbon will be retained.